Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Session Topic: Major Business Initiatives
  

Session Topic: Major Business Initiatives

Required Readings : Chapter 2

Chapter 2 individual assignment

Student Learning Outcomes:

1. Define supply chain management (SCM) systems and describe their strategic and

competitive opportunities.

2. Define customer relationship management (CRM) systems and describe their strategic

and competitive opportunities.

3. Explain the significance of enterprise resource planning (ERP) software as the integration

of functional software systems.

4. Define social media and describe a few of its many dimensions that make it important in

the business world.

INDIVIDUAL / GROUP ASSIGNMENT #: TITLE PAGE 1 OF 2
TEAM NAME (FOR TEAM ASSIGNMENTS ONLY)

Information Technology

MASY1-GC1240-200
Fall 2020

Instructor: Sam Chapper

[Student Name / Team Name]
[Individual / Group] Assignment #

Submitted on: Weekday, Month DD, YYYY

Submitted by (For team assignments only):

Student name

Student name

Student name

Student name

Student name

Assignment: Restate the assignment in full (just paste it in from the NYU Classes
Assignment page or whatever source in which it is provided).

INDIVIDUAL / GROUP ASSIGNMENT #: TITLE PAGE 2 OF 2
TEAM NAME (FOR TEAM ASSIGNMENTS ONLY)

<Delete this paragraph when delivering the assignment>

(Assignment content starts here with the title)

Content starts here, please review sections below for instructions.
<Delete section ends>

<Delete these paragraphs when delivering the assignment>
Page Header: Do not forget to modify the header to include the assignment number and tittle.
<Delete section ends>

<Delete these paragraphs when delivering the assignment>
General instructions

 Individual assignments should not be longer than one page.
 The list of references may be on a second page.
 If you feel you need to go longer than one page, please remember that we practice standard

business writing rules. That means you should have either a separate Executive Summary page or
a summary section at the top of the first page of your assignment followed by the details of the
paper. The summary could consist of a brief paragraph or a few bulleted points. This is done so
that one can quickly learn the main points of your paper and only have to go further if something
is unclear. The instructor, of course, will read your entire paper.

 Remember to use subheads.
 Have your responses follow the sequence of the assignment so that you make it easy to read and

are sure you do not leave anything out.
 All work should be in Times New Roman font, 11-point type, single or double spaced (Contact

your instructor if you have to use word processing software that does NOT include Times New
Roman or the equivalent).

 Do NOT adjust any of the margins, or other settings in this template. The instructor will change
them back to the template defaults and measure the length of your content accordingly.

<Delete section ends>

<Delete this paragraph when delivering the assignment>

1. Cite Sources Used

a. Use of APA format is mandatory. For more information on APA format, see
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/02/ or
http://library.williams.edu/citing/styles/apa.php.

b. Please provide citations within the text, along with a list of references used.

2. Plagiarism – For more information about plagiarism, consult
https://www.sps.nyu.edu/homepage/student-experience/policies-and-procedures.html#Graduate1
or www.plagiarism.org.

<Delete section ends>

<Delete this paragraph when delivering the assignment>

References

Do not forget to provide the list of references used. It can be added on a separate page, and it does not
count towards the page limit.
<Delete section ends>

  • Information Technology
    • MASY1-GC1240-200
    • Fall 2020
    • Instructor: Sam Chapper
    • [Student Name / Team Name] [Individual / Group] Assignment #

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Less managing. More teaching. Greater learning.

INSTRUCTORS GET:

• Interactive Applications – book-specific interactive
assignments that require students to APPLY what
they’ve learned.

• Simple assignment management, allowing you to
spend more time teaching.

• Auto-graded assignments, quizzes, and tests.

• Detailed Visual Reporting where student and
section results can be viewed and analyzed.

• Sophisticated online testing capability.

• A filtering and reporting function
that allows you to easily assign and
report on materials that are correlated
to accreditation standards, learning
outcomes, and Bloom’s taxonomy.

• An easy-to-use lecture capture tool.

Would you like your students to show up for class more prepared? (Let’s face it, class
is much more fun if everyone is engaged and prepared…)

Want ready-made application-level interactive assignments, student progress
reporting, and auto-assignment grading? (Less time grading means more time teaching…)

Want an instant view of student or class performance relative to learning
objectives? (No more wondering if students understand…)

Need to collect data and generate reports required for administration or
accreditation? (Say goodbye to manually tracking student learning outcomes…)

Want to record and post your lectures for students to view online?

INSTRUCTORS…

With McGraw-Hill’s Connect® MIS,

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Want an online, searchable version of your textbook?

Wish you could reference your textbook online while you’re doing
your assignments?

Want to get more value from your textbook purchase?

Think learning MIS should be a bit more interesting?

Connect® Plus MIS eBook
If you choose to use Connect™ Plus MIS, you have an affordable and
searchable online version of your book integrated with your other
online tools.

Connect® Plus MIS eBook offers features like:
• Topic search

• Direct links from assignments

• Adjustable text size

• Jump to page number

• Print by section

Check out the STUDENT RESOURCES
section under the Connect® Library tab.
Here you’ll find a wealth of resources designed to help you
achieve your goals in the course. You’ll find things like quizzes,
PowerPoints, and Internet activities to help you study.
Every student has different needs, so explore the STUDENT
RESOURCES to find the materials best suited to you.

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Management Information Systems
FOR THE INFORMATION AGE

NINTH EDITION

Stephen Haag
DANIELS COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

UNIVERSITY OF DENVER

Maeve Cummings
KELCE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

PITTSBURG STATE UNIVERSITY

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MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS FOR THE INFORMATION AGE
Published by McGraw-Hill/Irwin, a business unit of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 1221 Avenue
of the Americas, New York, NY, 10020. Copyright © 2013, 2010, 2008, 2007, 2005, 2004, 2002, 2000,
1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America.
No part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in
a database or retrieval system, without the prior written consent of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.,
including, but not limited to, in any network or other electronic storage or transmission, or broadcast for
distance learning.

Some ancillaries, including electronic and print components, may not be available to customers outside the
United States.

This book is printed on acid-free paper.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 DOW/DOW 1 0 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

ISBN 978-0-07-337685-1
MHID 0-07-337685-X

Vice president and editor-in-chief: Brent Gordon
Editorial director: Paul Ducham
Executive director of development: Ann Torbert
Senior sponsoring editor: Anke Weekes
Senior development editor: Trina Hauger
Editorial coordinator: Jonathan Thornton
Vice president and director of marketing: Robin J. Zwettler
Marketing director: Amee Mosley
Vice president of editing, design, and production: Sesha Bolisetty
Senior manager, publishing services: Mary Conzachi
Senior buyer: Carol A. Bielski
Senior designer: Mary Kazak Sander
Senior photo research coordinator: Keri Johnson
Media project manager: Suresh Babu , Hurix Systems Pvt, Ltd.
Media project manager: Joyce J. Chappetto
Cover design: Laurie Entringer
Cover image: © itestro-Fotolia.com
Typeface: 11/13 Bulmer MT
Compositor: Laserwords Private Limited
Printer: R. R. Donnelley

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Haag, Stephen.
Management information systems for the information age / Stephen Haag, Maeve
Cummings. — 9th ed.
p. cm.
Includes index.
ISBN 978-0-07-337685-1 (alk. paper)
ISBN 0-07-337685-X (alk. paper)
1. Management information systems. 2. Information technology. I. Cummings, Maeve. II. Title.
T58.6.H18 2013
658.4’038011—dc23
2011049557

www.mhhe.com

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D E D I C AT I O N

For my wife Pam: Conqueror of cancer

in 2011. My hero.

S t e p h e n H a a g

To Don Viney who showed

me in my darkest hour that

there can be life after death.

M a e v e C u m m i n g s

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vi

B R I E F TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

C H A P T E R O N E 2
The Information Age in Which You Live:
Changing the Face of Business

C H A P T E R T W O 34
Major Business Initiatives: Gaining
Competitive Advantage with IT

C H A P T E R T H R E E 64
Databases and Data Warehouses: Supporting
the Analytics-Driven Organization

C H A P T E R F O U R 96
Analytics, Decision Support, and Artificial
Intelligence: Brainpower for Your Business

C H A P T E R F I V E 126
Electronic Commerce: Strategies for the New
Economy

C H A P T E R S I X 158
Systems Development: Phases, Tools, and
Techniques

C H A P T E R S E V E N 194
Infrastructure, Cloud Computing, Metrics, and
Business Continuity Planning: Building and
Sustaining the Dynamic Enterprise

C H A P T E R E I G H T 224
Protecting People and Information: Threats
and Safeguards

C H A P T E R N I N E 256
Emerging Trends and Technologies: Business,
People, and Technology Tomorrow

P R O J E C T S 286
Group Projects
Electronic Commerce Projects

EXTENDED LEARNING MODULE A 322
Computer Hardware and Software

EXTENDED LEARNING MODULE B 350
The World Wide Web and the Internet

EXTENDED LEARNING MODULE C 370
Designing Databases and Entity-Relationship
Diagramming

EXTENDED LEARNING MODULE D
(OFFICE 2010 VERSION) 386
Decision Analysis with Spreadsheet Software

EXTENDED LEARNING MODULE D
(OFFICE 2007 VERSION) (on OLC)
Decision Analysis with Spreadsheet Software

EXTENDED LEARNING MODULE E 408
Network Basics

EXTENDED LEARNING MODULE F (on OLC)
Building a Web Page with HTML

EXTENDED LEARNING MODULE G (on OLC)
Object-Oriented Technologies

EXTENDED LEARNING MODULE H 436
Computer Crime and Digital Forensics

EXTENDED LEARNING MODULE I (on OLC)
Building an E-Portfolio

EXTENDED LEARNING MODULE J (OFFICE
2010 VERSION) 472
Implementing a Database with Microsoft Access

EXTENDED LEARNING MODULE J
(OFFICE 2007 VERSION) (on OLC)
Implementing a Database with Microsoft Access

EXTENDED LEARNING MODULE K (on OLC)
Careers in Business

EXTENDED LEARNING MODULE L (on OLC)
Building Web Sites with FrontPage

EXTENDED LEARNING MODULE M (on OLC)
Programming in Excel with VBA

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vii

TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

C H A P T E R O N E
The Information Age in Which You
Live: Changing the Face of Business 3

OUTRAGEOUS INDUSTRY TRANSFORMATION: CELL
PHONES DOOM PHONE REVENUES FOR HOTELS 3

INTRODUCTION 4

MIS RESOURCE NO 1: INFORMATION 5

Defining Information Quality 8
Considering Information from an Organizational

Perspective 8

MIS RESOURCE NO 2: PEOPLE 10

Technology Literacy 11
Information Literacy 11
Your Ethical Responsibilities 12

MIS RESOURCE NO 3: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 13

Key Technology Categories 13

FINANCIAL IMPACT OF IT: BREAK-EVEN ANALYSIS 15

Reducing Fixed Costs 16
Reducing Variable Costs 17
Increasing Revenue 18

INDUSTRY IMPACT OF IT: PORTER’S FIVE FORCES MODEL 19

Buyer Power 19
Supplier Power 20
Threat of Substitute Products or Services 21
Threat of New Entrants 21
Rivalry among Existing Competitors 22

STRATEGY IMPACT OF IT: PORTER (AGAIN) AND RGT 23

Overall Cost Leadership 23
Differentiation 24
Focus 24
Summary: Student Learning Outcomes

Revisited 26

CLOSING CASE STUDY ONE: THE SOCIAL MEDIA
MEGAPHONE: TRANSPARENT LIFE INTENSIFIED 27

CLOSING CASE STUDY TWO: GOOGLE AND APPLE
KNOW WHERE YOU ARE, MAYBE 29

KEY TERMS AND CONCEPTS 30

SHORT-ANSWER QUESTIONS 31

ASSIGNMENTS AND EXERCISES 31

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS 32

Chapter Projects 32

C H A P T E R T W O
Major Business Initiatives: Gaining
Competitive Advantage with IT 35

OUTRAGEOUS INDUSTRY TRANSFORMATION:
DEATH OF A TRAVEL AGENT 35

INTRODUCTION 36

SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT 36

Strategic and Competitive Opportunities
with SCM 38

IT Support for Supply Chain Management 39

CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT 40

Strategic and Competitive Opportunities
with CRM 42

IT Support for Customer Relationship
Management 42

ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING—BRINGING
IT ALL TOGETHER 45

The Evolution of ERP Systems 47
ERP Functionality 48
ERP Software for Market Size 50

SOCIAL MEDIA 51

Social Networking 52
Social Shopping 54
Social Playing 54
Social “Saving the World” 55
Social Locationing 56

SUMMARY: STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
REVISITED 58

CLOSING CASE STUDY ONE: COCA-COLA IS
EVERYTHING: SCM, CRM, ERP, SOCIAL MEDIA,
YOU NAME IT 59

CLOSING CASE STUDY TWO: THE BUSINESS OF SOCIAL
MEDIA AND MAKING THE ROI CASE 60

KEY TERMS AND CONCEPTS 61

SHORT-ANSWER QUESTIONS 62

ASSIGNMENTS AND EXERCISES 62

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viii Table of Contents

C H A P T E R F O U R
Analytics, Decision Support, and
Artificial Intelligence: Brainpower
for Your Business 97

OUTRAGEOUS INDUSTRY TRANSFORMATION:
ONLINE LEARNING 97

INTRODUCTION 98

DECISIONS AND DECISION SUPPORT 98

Decisions 98
Decision Support Systems 101

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS 103

DATA-MINING TOOLS AND MODELS 104

Predictive Analytics 105
Text Analytics 108
Endless Analytics 109

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 110

Expert Systems 110
Neural Networks and Fuzzy Logic 111
Genetic Algorithms 113

AGENT-BASED TECHNOLOGIES 114

Intelligent Agents 114
Multi-Agent Systems 115

SUMMARY: STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES REVISITED 118

CLOSING CASE STUDY ONE: CRYSTAL BALL,
CLAIRVOYANT, FORTUNE TELLING . . . CAN
PREDICTIVE ANALYTICS DELIVER THE FUTURE? 119

CLOSING CASE STUDY TWO: DECISION SUPPORT
IS GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH 121

KEY TERMS AND CONCEPTS 122

SHORT-ANSWER QUESTIONS 123

ASSIGNMENTS AND EXERCISES 123

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS 124

Chapter Projects 125

C H A P T E R F I V E
Electronic Commerce: Strategies for
the New Economy 127

OUTRAGEOUS INDUSTRY TRANSFORMATION:
ADVERTISING DOLLARS GO WHERE THE EYES ARE 127

INTRODUCTION 128

E-COMMERCE BUSINESS MODELS 128

Business to Business (B2B) E-Commerce 129
Business to Consumer (B2C) E-Commerce 130

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS 63

Chapter Projects 63

C H A P T E R T H R E E
Databases and Data Warehouses:

Supporting the Analytics-Driven
Organization 65

OUTRAGEOUS INDUSTRY TRANSFORMATION: DID YOU
KNOW CDS COME FROM DEAD DINOSAURS? 65

INTRODUCTION 66

THE RELATIONAL DATABASE MODEL 68

Collections of Information 68
Created with Logical Structures 68
With Logical Ties within the Information 70
With Built-In Integrity Constraints 71

DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM TOOLS 72

Data Definition Subsystem 73
Data Manipulation Subsystem 74
Application Generation Subsystem 77
Data Administration Subsystem 77

DATA WAREHOUSES AND DATA MINING 79

What Is a Data Warehouse? 79
The Tool Set of the Analytics Professional 81
The Analytics Life Cycle 83
Data Marts: Smaller Data Warehouses 84
Important Considerations in Using a Data

Warehouse 85

INFORMATION OWNERSHIP 86

Strategic Management Support 86
Sharing Information with Responsibility 87
Information Cleanliness 87

SUMMARY: STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES REVISITED 88

CLOSING CASE STUDY ONE: WHEN MAKING A
DATABASE OF PUBLIC INFORMATION AVAILABLE
TO THE PUBLIC CAN BE BAD 89

CLOSING CASE STUDY TWO: WHEN MAKING A
DATABASE OF PRIVATE AND COMPANY-STRATEGIC
INFORMATION AVAILABLE TO THE PUBLIC CAN BE GOOD 90

KEY TERMS AND CONCEPTS 91

SHORT-ANSWER QUESTIONS 92

ASSIGNMENTS AND EXERCISES 92

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS 93

Chapter Projects 94

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Table of Contents ix

COMPONENT-BASED DEVELOPMENT 167

Rapid Application Development Methodology 167
Extreme Programming Methodology 168
Agile Methodology 170
Service-Oriented Architecture—An Architecture

Perspective 170

SELFSOURCING (END-USER DEVELOPMENT) 170

The Selfsourcing Process 171
The Advantages of Selfsourcing 172
Potential Pitfalls and Risks of Selfsourcing 173
Which Applications for IT to Offload 173
The Right Tool for the Job 174

PROTOTYPING 174

The Prototyping Process 175
The Advantages of Prototyping 177
The Disadvantages of Prototyping 177

OUTSOURCING 178

The Outsourcing Process 180
The Service Level Agreement 182
Geopolitical Outsourcing Options 182
The Advantages and Disadvantages

of Outsourcing 184

SUMMARY: STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES REVISITED 185

CLOSING CASE STUDY ONE: THE GOOD-ENOUGH
TECHNOLOGY ECONOMY 186

CLOSING CASE STUDY TWO: TABLETS TAKE THEIR
PLACE IN THE PC MARKET 187

KEY TERMS AND CONCEPTS 189

SHORT-ANSWER QUESTIONS 189

ASSIGNMENTS AND EXERCISES 190

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS 191

Chapter Projects 192

C H A P T E R S E V E N
Infrastructure, Cloud Computing,
Metrics, and Business Continuity
Planning: Building and Sustaining
the Dynamic Enterprise 195

OUTRAGEOUS INDUSTRY TRANSFORMATION:
MONEY WILL ALWAYS BE MONEY 195

INTRODUCTION 196

Customers 196
End Users 197
Software Development 198
Information Needs 198
Hardware Requirements 198

Consumer to Business (C2B) E-Commerce 130
Consumer to Consumer (C2C) E-Commerce 131

UNDERSTAND YOUR BUSINESS, PRODUCTS,
SERVICES, AND CUSTOMERS 132

Who Are Your Customers? 132
What Is the Value of Your Products and Services

as Perceived by Your Customers? 132

FIND CUSTOMERS AND ESTABLISH RELATIONSHIPS 137

Business to Consumer 137
Business to Business 139

MOVE MONEY EASILY AND SECURELY 140

Business to Consumer Payment Systems 140
Business to Business Payment Systems 142
Security: The Pervading Concern 143

E-BUSINESS TRENDS 144

Long-Tail Economics 145
Crowdsourcing 146
Virtual Goods 147
Mobile Commerce 148

SUMMARY: STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES REVISITED 149

CLOSING CASE STUDY ONE: WHEN YOU’RE BIG,
YOU CAN BE YOUR OWN B2B E-MARKETPLACE 151

CLOSING CASE STUDY TWO: THE MOBILE
COMMERCE EXPLOSION 153

KEY TERMS AND CONCEPTS 154

SHORT-ANSWER QUESTIONS 155

ASSIGNMENTS AND EXERCISES 155

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS 156

Chapter Projects 156

C H A P T E R S I X
Systems Development: Phases, Tools,
and Techniques 159

OUTRAGEOUS INDUSTRY TRANSFORMATION:
CAMERAS USE FILM? 159

INTRODUCTION 160

INSOURCING AND THE SYSTEMS
DEVELOPMENT LIFE CYCLE 160

Phase 1: Planning 162
Phase 2: Analysis 163
Phase 3: Design 164
Phase 4: Development 164
Phase 5: Testing 165
Phase 6: Implementation 165
Phase 7: Maintenance 166

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x Table of Contents

SECURITY 244

Security and Employees 244
Security and Outside Threats 245
Security Precautions 247

SUMMARY: STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES REVISITED 249

CLOSING CASE STUDY ONE: SEXTING NOW
ALMOST COMMONPLACE 250

CLOSING CASE STUDY TWO: SONY REELS FROM
MULTIPLE HACKER ATTACKS 252

KEY TERMS AND CONCEPTS 253

SHORT-ANSWER QUESTIONS 253

ASSIGNMENTS AND EXERCISES 253

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS 254

Chapter Projects 255

C H A P T E R N I N E
Emerging Trends and Technologies:
Business, People, and Technology
Tomorrow 257

OUTRAGEOUS INDUSTRY TRANSFORMATION: THERE
IS NO LONGER ONE IN EVERY TOWN 257

INTRODUCTION 258

THE CHANGING INTERNET 259

Personal Software-as-a-Service 259
Push, Not Pull, Technologies and

Personalization 260

F2b2C: A New E-Commerce Business Model 261
Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) 262
Web 3.0 (Is Web 2.0 Already Old?) 262
E-Society 264

PHYSIOLOGICAL INTERACTION 264

Automatic Speech Recognition 264
Virtual Reality 265
Cave Automatic Virtual Environments 265
Haptic Interfaces 266
Biometrics 267

THE WIRELESS ARENA 270

The Next Generation of Smartphone
Technology 270

RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) 271

PURE TECHNOLOGY 274

Nanotechnology 274
Multi-State CPUs 275
Holographic Storage Devices 275

HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE INFRASTRUCTURE 199

Enterprise Resource Planning
(ERP) Revisited 199

Supporting Network Infrastructures 201
Cloud Computing: No Infrastructure

at All 203

IT SUCCESS METRICS 209

Efficiency and Effectiveness Metrics 209
Web-centric Metrics 211
Call Center Metrics 212

BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANNING 212

Phase 1: Organizational Strategic Plan 213
Phase 2: Analysis 213
Phase 3: Design 214
Phase 4: Implementation 214
Phase 5: Testing 215
Phase 6: Maintenance 215

SUMMARY: STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES REVISITED 216

CLOSING CASE STUDY ONE: PUBLIC
“PERSONAL” CLOUDS 218

CLOSING CASE STUDY TWO: DENVER HEALTH
OPERATES WITH A PRIVATE CLOUD AND THIN CLIENTS 219

KEY TERMS AND CONCEPTS 220

SHORT-ANSWER QUESTIONS 221

ASSIGNMENTS AND EXERCISES 221

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS 222

Chapter Projects 222

C H A P T E R E I G H T
Protecting People and Information:

Threats and Safeguards 225

OUTRAGEOUS INDUSTRY TRANSFORMATION:
TRANSFORMATIONS IN MEDICINE MEAN BETTER LIVES 225

INTRODUCTION 226

ETHICS 226

Two Factors That Determine How You
Decide Ethical Issues 228

Intellectual Property 229

PRIVACY 231

Privacy and Other Individuals 231
Identity Theft 232
Privacy and Employees 235
Privacy and Consumers 238
Privacy and Government Agencies 241
Laws on Privacy 243

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Table of Contents xi

EXTENDED LEARNING MODULE B 350
The World Wide Web and the Internet

INTRODUCTION 351

WORLD WIDE WEB 352

Web Sites, Addresses, and Pages 352
Understanding Addresses 353
Using Web Browser Software 354

SEARCH ENGINES 356

WEB 2.0 357
Wikis 357
Social Networking Sites 358
Blogs 358
RSS Feeds 359
Podcasting 359

INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES 359

The Internet Backbone 359
Internet Servers 360
Communications Protocols 360

CONNECTING TO THE INTERNET 362

Communications Software 362
Telecommunications Hardware 363

SUMMARY: STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES REVISITED 365

KEY TERMS AND CONCEPTS 366

SHORT-ANSWER QUESTIONS 367

ASSIGNMENTS AND EXERCISES 367

EXTENDED LEARNING MODULE C 370
Designing Databases and Entity-Relationship
Diagramming

INTRODUCTION 371

DESIGNING AND BUILDING A RELATIONAL DATABASE 371
Step 1: Define Entity Classes and Primary Keys 373
Step 2: Define Relationships among

the Entity Classes 374
Step 3: Define Information (Fields)

for Each Relation 380
Step 4: Use a Data Definition Language to Create

Your Database 383

SUMMARY: STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES REVISITED 383

KEY TERMS AND CONCEPTS 384

SHORT-ANSWER QUESTIONS 384

ASSIGNMENTS AND EXERCISES 385

MOST IMPORTANT CONSIDERATIONS 275

The Necessity of Technology 276
Closing the Great Digital Divide 276
Technology for the Betterment of Society 276
Exchanging Privacy for Convenience 276
Ethics, Ethics, Ethics 277
Making Predictions 277

SUMMARY: STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES REVISITED 278

CLOSING CASE STUDY ONE: JUST HOW BIG
IS THE IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY ON SOCIETY? 280

CLOSING CASE STUDY TWO: SMARTPHONES
AND THE GREAT DIGITAL DIVIDE 282

KEY TERMS AND CONCEPTS 283

SHORT-ANSWER QUESTIONS 283

ASSIGNMENTS AND EXERCISES 284

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS 284

Chapter Projects 285

EXTENDED LEARNING
MODULE A 322
Computer Hardware and Software

A QUICK TOUR OF TECHNOLOGY 323

CATEGORIES OF COMPUTERS BY SIZE 325

Smartphones 325
Tablet PCs, Slates, and E-Readers 325
Notebook Computers 325
Desktop Computers 326
Minicomputers, Mainframe Computers, and

Supercomputers 327

SOFTWARE: YOUR INTELLECTUAL INTERFACE 328

Application Software 328
System Software 331

HARDWARE: YOUR PHYSICAL INTERFACE 333

Common Input Devices 334
Common Output Devices 336
Common Storage Devices 338
CPU and RAM 340
Connecting the Hardware Outside

to the Hardware Inside 342

SUMMARY: STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES REVISITED 345

KEY TERMS AND CONCEPTS 346

SHORT-ANSWER QUESTIONS 348

ASSIGNMENTS AND EXERCISES 348

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xii Table of Contents

CLASSIFYING NETWORKS BY DISTANCE 414

LANs, WANs, and MANs 414

INTERNET 415

Bandwidth 415
Internet Connection Types 416
Voice over IP 421

NETWORK COMMUNICATIONS MEDIA 422

Wired Communications Media 422
Wireless Communications Media 423

NETWORK SECURITY 426

Principles of Computer Security 426
Firewalls and Intrusion Detection Systems 427
Encrypted Communications: SSL and Virtual

Private Networks 428
Other Security Threats: Malware 429

SUMMARY: STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES REVISITED 430

KEY TERMS AND CONCEPTS 432

SHORT-ANSWER QUESTIONS 432

ASSIGNMENTS AND EXERCISES 433

EXTENDED LEARNING
MODULE F (on OLC)
Building a Web Page with HTML F.1

INTRODUCTION F.2

HYPERTEXT MARKUP LANGUAGE (HTML) F.3
Working with and Viewing Your

Web Site Locally F.4

BASIC TEXT FORMATTING F.5

CREATING HEADINGS F.6

ADJUSTING TEXT COLOR F.7

ADJUSTING TEXT SIZE F.8

CHANGING THE BACKGROUND COLOR F.9

ADDING LINKS TO A WEB SITE F.10
Links to Other Web Sites or Pages F.10
Links to Downloadable Files F.11
Links to E-Mail F.11

ADDING IMAGES F.12
Sizing Images F.12
Positioning Images F.13

USING A TEXTURED BACKGROUND F.14

CREATING AND USING LISTS F.15

Numbered Lists F.15
Unnumbered Lists F.16

EXTENDED LEARNING MODULE D 386
Decision Analysis with Spreadsheet Software

INTRODUCTION 387

LISTS 388

BASIC FILTER 390

CUSTOM FILTER 392

CONDITIONAL FORMATTING 394

PIVOT TABLES 396

GOAL SEEK 402

SUMMARY: STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES REVISITED 404

KEY TERMS AND CONCEPTS 405

ASSIGNMENTS AND EXERCISES 405

EXTENDED LEARNING MODULE D (on OLC)
Decision Analysis with Spreadsheet
Software D.1

INTRODUCTION D.2

LISTS D.3

BASIC FILTER D.5

CUSTOM FILTER D.7

CONDITIONAL FORMATTING D.9

PIVOT TABLES D.11

BACK TO DECISION SUPPORT D.18

Filter D.18
Conditional Formatting D.18
Pivot Table D.18

SUMMARY: STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES REVISITED D.19

KEY TERMS AND CONCEPTS D.19

ASSIGNMENTS AND EXERCISES D.19

EXTENDED LEARNING MODULE E 408
Network Basics

INTRODUCTION 409
Basic Principles of Networks 409

HOME NETWORKS 410
Network Cards in Each Computer 410
Wired and Wireless Transmission Media 410
Home Internet Service and Broadband Routers 411
Network Software 412

NETWORK COMPONENTS 412

Switches 412
Routers 413

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EXTENDED LEARNING MODULE H 436
Computer Crime and Digital Forensics

INTRODUCTION 437

COMPUTER CRIME 438

Outside the Organization 438
Web Defacing 445
Cyber War 446
The Players 446

DIGITAL FORENSICS 448

The Collection Phase 449
The Analysis Phase 453
Analytics in Forensics 458
Anti-Forensics 460

WHO NEEDS DIGITAL FORENSICS INVESTIGATORS? 463

Proactive Digital Forensics Education for
Problem Prevention 464

Reactive Digital Forensics for Incident
Response 465

A Day in the Life 465

SUMMARY: STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES REVISITED 467

KEY TERMS AND CONCEPTS 468

SHORT-ANSWER QUESTIONS 469

ASSIGNMENTS AND EXERCISES 469

EXTENDED LEARNING
MODULE I (on OLC)
Building an E-Portfolio I.1

INTRODUCTION I.2

THE ELECTRONIC JOB MARKET—EXTENDING
YOUR REACH I.2

CONVERGENCE OF ONLINE NETWORKING AND RÉSUMÉ
DEVELOPMENT I.4

Start to Network I.4
Perform a Self-Assessment I.5
Research Careers, Industries,

and Companies I.7

RÉSUMÉ BUILDING—A LIFELONG PROCESS I.7

Content, Content, Content I.7
Electronic File Formats I.11
What Is the Right Résumé Style? I.16

DEVELOPING YOUR JOB SEARCH E-PORTFOLIO I.17

Self-Promotion I.18
Give Them What They Want I.18
The Shape of an E-Portfolio I.19
E-Gallery I.20

SUMMARY: STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES REVISITED F.18

KEY TERMS AND CONCEPTS F.19

SHORT-ANSWER QUESTIONS F.19

ASSIGNMENTS AND EXERCISES F.19

EXTENDED LEARNING
MODULE G (on OLC)
Object-Oriented Technologies G.1

INTRODUCTION G.2

TRADITIONAL TECHNOLOGY APPROACH G.2

Information View G.2
Procedure View G.3

OBJECT-ORIENTED TECHNOLOGY APPROACH G.4

Information and Procedure Views Combined G.4
Object-Oriented Approach and the Real World G.5

FIVE PRIMARY CONCEPTS OF OBJECT-ORIENTED
TECHNOLOGIES G.5

Information G.5
Procedures G.6
Classes G.6
Objects G.7
Messages G.8
How the Five Primary Concepts Interact G.8

REAL-WORLD OBJECT-ORIENTED EXAMPLES G.9

THREE FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF
OBJECT-ORIENTED TECHNOLOGIES G.10

Inheritance G.10
Encapsulation G.12
Polymorphism G.13

PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER: A BUSINESS EXAMPLE G.14

Eighteen Months to Get a New Product
to Market G.14

Inventory Control G.16
Scalability and Expandability G.16

TYPES OF OBJECT-ORIENTED TECHNOLOGIES G.17

Object-Oriented Programming Languages G.18
Object-Oriented Database Systems G.18
Object-Oriented Technologies and

Client/Server Environments G.18
The Future of Object-Oriented

Technologies G.20

SUMMARY: STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES REVISITED G.20

KEY TERMS AND CONCEPTS G.21

SHORT-ANSWER QUESTIONS G.21

ASSIGNMENTS AND EXERCISES G.22

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INTRODUCTION J.2

SOLOMON ENTERPRISES DATABASE J.3

Implementing the Structure of the Solomon
Enterprises Database J.5

Implementing the Raw Material Relation
Structure J.7

Implementing the Concrete Type Relation
Structure J.9

Implementing the Bill of Material Relation
Structure J.10

DEFINING RELATIONSHIPS WITHIN THE SOLOMON
ENTERPRISES DATABASE J.12

ENTERING INFORMATION INTO THE
SOLOMON DATABASE J.15

Changing the Structure of Information in
Relations J.18

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