Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Please Follow directions or I will dispute - Study Help
  

Please Follow directions or I will dispute 

Will be checked for plagiarism!!

Attachment is below: Please read and use to assist in completing of PowerPoint 

Topic: Lewis change model

Create a PowerPoint presentation based on your final research paper topic. The presentation should have an introduction slide, as well as a reference slide(s) at the end of the presentation. There should be a minimum of 10 slides that cover contentthe content of your Research Paper in a presentation format.

4

Lewin’s Change Management Model

Student’s Name

Institution Name

Course Name

Instructor’s Name

Assignment Due Date

Abstract

Change is indispensable in the corporate world since organizations are increasingly aiming to remain competitive and be successful. Various theories have been developed to facilitate change management and implementation, including “Lewin’s three-step change model, Lippitt’s phases of change theory, Prochaska and DiClemente’s change theory, social cognitive theory, and the theory of reasoned action and planned behavior”. While all these models are beneficial, Lewin’s change management model is increasingly gaining momentum and continuously used to manage change. This model incorporates three steps, including unfreezing, changing, and refreezing. In correlation with the contributions of these steps throughout the change process, Lewin’s change management model shapes organizations for success in relation to implementation of change.

Keywords: change, change management, Lewin’s change management model, organizational change, communication, leadership.

Lewin’s Change Management Model

Change is indispensable in the corporate world since organizations are increasingly aiming to remain competitive and be successful. There is a need to continuously formulate and implement new strategies to satisfy the consumers, ascertaining that change is a relatively important process for organizations (Edgar, 1996). While the significance of change is undeniably massive, the idea is not always welcomed and change is resisted as a result. In this regard, the implementation of change is occasionally problematic and leads to decreased organizational performances. However, this challenge can be addressed and eliminated by incorporating change management, which helps in organizing and smoothening the transition process.

As discussed by Kritsonis (2005), some of the popular change theories relevant for the management of change include, “Lewin’s three-step change model, Lippitt’s phases of change theory, Prochaska and DiClemente’s change theory, social cognitive theory, and the theory of reasoned action and planned behavior”. All these theories have significant benefits in line with effective management and implementation of change. However, Lewin’s change management model is increasingly gaining momentum and continuously used to manage change since it was introduced in the 1940s (Cummings, Bridgman, & Brown, 2016). In this regard, this essay aims at focusing on Lewin’s change management model and various aspects of this model, including communication and organizational leadership as well. It will also establish the contributions of this change management model towards shaping organization for success in relation to implementation of change.

Burnes (2020) elaborate on Lewin’s change management model and highlights the three stages incorporated in the model, which include, unfreeze, change, and refreeze. The unfreeze stage of this model is the starting point of the change process. It emphasizes on the need and significance of change, attributed to the realization of ineffective strategies and operations linked to limited organizational performance and productivity. With an aim of moving away from outdated strategies and ways of doing things, this step focuses on overcoming the pressure linked to resistance of change since it alters the stable equilibrium within organizations. In this same context, it is structured to creat motivation and a sense of urgency for the implementation of the desired change (Kaminski, 2011).

The second step, change, involves the implementation of change and preparation of transitioning towards a new state in line with the changes made (Burnes, 2020). There is a need to define the change vision at this step as this will facilitate an understanding of the benefits of a change. Being the step that support the actual implementation of change, it is defined by two significant factors, including leadership and communication. These factors help eliminate the state of uncertainty, which is detrimental to organizational changes. Based on the illustration of this step of Lewin’s change management model, the successful implementation of change occurs when the factors supporting the change are greater than those against it.

Refreezing, also referred to as freezing is the last stage and it is linked to the successful implementation of change. It freezes and solidifies the changes made to attain some form of stability which was altered by the change process (Burnes, 2020). With an attempt to accept the changes implemented and the new norms of the organization, this stage of Lewin’s change management model supports the formulation and integration of new organizational practices, values, operations, procedures, and structure. In this regard, this stage directly promotes a change in the organizational culture.

As documented by Kritsonis (2005), change promotes the success of organizations but the success of implementing a change is attributed to the change theory utilized. With various possible change models, Lewin’s model yields significant benefits. An instance of its application is evident in the various changes incorporated within organizations as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has massively affected the corporate world. Organizations have been subjected to make changes that will keep operations afloat and remain competitive and profitable. One major change that was observed was the need to reduce staff members. Attributed to the measures instigated to curb the spread of the virus, organizations also had to make the tough decision to keep employees work from home. The application of Lewin’s change management model ascertained that these changes were successfully implemented. This model has also supported the implementation of change in the healthcare industry, which has been massively affected by the pandemic.

With leaders centrally placed in the implementation of change, leadership styles are strongly integrated with change management as they affect the process of implementing a change (Hussain, Syed & SHEN, Lei & Akram, Tayyaba & Haider, Muhammad & Hussain, Syed & Ali, Muhammad, 2016). Without efficient leadership skills, it is challenging to convince subordinates of the need to support the implementation of a specific change. Thus, leadership styles make significant contributions towards the successful utilization of Lewin’s change management model. In this sense, this change management model significantly shapes organizational leaders. This change model also ascertains that leaders are better positioned to manage change and handle resistance from staff members within an organization.

Additionally, the process defining Lewin’s change management model emphasizes on the need to involve employees (Hussain et al., 2016). The involvement of employees helps in addressing the key challenge of resistance. In correlation with the contributions of leaders in implementing change, paying attention to the mployees will ascertain that the implemented change will address their concerns. In this same context, Kaminski (2011) asserted that the support of employees regarding a change leads to its successful implementation. In addition to this, it is imperative to include strategies that will help leaders deal with resistance, including motivating employees by introducing relevant incentives. Besides, motivating employees will ascertain that they participate in the implementation of changes and reduce the negative impact of change in organizational performance and productivity (Kaminski, 2011). However, it isn’t appropriate to blackmail employees into accepting and supporting a proposed change.

In line with employee involvement linked to Lewin’s change management model, it is evident that the model also supports knowledge and information sharing within an organization. Interaction between employees supports the sharing of relevant skills and experiences. As defined by Hussain et al. 2016, sharing knowledge smoothens the implementation of change as it promotes an understanding of why applying the change is necessary and ascertains that employees are able to use the skills gained to advance into the refreezing state of Lewin’s change management model (Hussain et al., 2016).

Communication is strongly integrated with all the phases of Lewin’s change management model. In this regard, the model stresses on the significance of effective communication in an organization. Directly communicating with the persons affected by the change to be implemented will facilitate an understanding of why the change is necessary. In addition to this, employees and other significant stakeholders will feel appreciated as they are involved in the change management process. As such, effective communication will not only help eliminate possible barriers and resistance to change, but it will also empower people to embrace change, an essential goal of Lewin’s change management model (Hussain et al., 2016).

While Lewin’s change management model is continuously criticized for being too simple (Burnes, 2020; Cummings et al., 2016), it is universal, and as such, can be used by any organization (Edgar, 1996). This aspect is an advantage of the model. Besides, it has been linked to successfully implementing change, the key objective of this model. In correlation with the contributions of this model in implementing change, most organizations today are continuously using the model. However, various factors within the organization ought to be considered, including the limitations attributed to the organizational challenges and the suggested change. Regardless, incorporating this change management model in the implementation of change yields significant outcomes. To maximize the outcome of Lewin’s change management model, it can be used with different other change theories and models.

References

Kritsonis, A. (2005). Comparison of Change Theories. International Journal Of Management, Business, And Administration Volume 8, Number 1.

Burnes, B. (2020). The Origins of Lewin’s Three-Step Model of Change. The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 56(1), 32–59. https://doi.org/10.1177/0021886319892685

Edgar S. (1996).Kurt Lewin’s Change Theory in the Field and in the Classroom: Notes Toward a Model of Managed Learning. Systems Practice; 9 no. 1 (1996): 27–47

Hussain, Syed & SHEN, Lei & Akram, Tayyaba & Haider, Muhammad & Hussain, Syed & Ali, Muhammad. (2016). Kurt Lewin’s process model for organizational change: The role of leadership and employee involvement: A critical review. Journal of Innovation & Knowledge. 10.1016/j.jik.2016.07.002.

Kaminski, J. (2011). Theory applied to informatics – Lewin’s Change Theory. CJNI Journal. http://cjni.net/Journal_original/Winter2011/cjni.net-_Theory_applied_to_informatics_%96_Lewin%92s_Change_Theory___CJNI_Journal_.pdf

Cummings, S., Bridgman, T, & Brown.K. G. (2016). Unfreezing change as three steps: Rethinking Kurt Lewin’s legacy for change management. Human relations 2016, Vol. 69(1) 33–60

error: Content is protected !!